The Friend of Africa

Dr David Livingstone in 1864 Born 19 March 1813 Blantyre, Scotland

Died 1 May 1873 (aged 60) Chief Chitambo’s Village, Kingdom of Kazembe (today Zambia)

Cause of death Malaria and internal bleeding due to dysentery

Resting place Westminster Abbey 51°29′58″N 0°07′39″W

Known for Spreading the Gospel and Exploration of Africa

Spouse(s) Mary (née Moffat; m. 1845 – 27 April 1862; her death); 6 children

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The FAMILY, FAITH and UPBRINGING of DAVID LIVINGSTONE

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19 March 1813 marked the birth of Scottish Missionary David Livingstone.

The Fighting Missionary
The hero of the Battle of Waterloo, the Duke of Wellington, described Dr. David Livingstone as "The fighting parson."

The Friend of Africa
Jacob Wainwright, who had been rescued from slavery by Dr. Livingstone, described him as: "The friend of the African."

Practical Christianity
American journalist and explorer, Henry Morton Stanley, described Dr. Livingstone as: "A truly pious man, a man deeply imbued with real religious instincts. His religion… is of the true, practical kind, never losing a chance to manifest itself in a quiet, practical way, never demonstrative or loud. It is always at work, if not in deed, by shining example."

An Example of Excellence
Stanley described his attitude when he first arrived in Africa: "as prejudiced against religion as the worst infidel…" However, the example of David Livingstone, who had truly left all to follow Christ, converted Stanley. It is not so much what you say, but what you do that counts. Action is eloquence. David Livingstone said what he meant. He meant what he said and he did all he promised. He was true to his word.

Inspiring
David Livingstone was hailed in his lifetime as the greatest missionary explorer of all time. As one contemporary journalist described it: "the Christian’s Faith in God is strengthened by the author’s very survival of every imaginable danger. The abolitionist is inspired by the prospect of stopping the slave trade. Medical men are intrigued by Livingstone’s approach to disease and the value of his treatment for fever…" The incredible courage and sacrifices of David Livingstone inspired multiplied hundreds of men and women to dedicate their lives to Missions in Africa. What can we learn about the family and upbringing of David Livingstone, to understand his Faith, courage and vision?

David Livingstone preaching to Africans Born in Blantyre
David Livingstone was born 19 March 1813, in the industrial town of Blantyre, 8 miles from Glasgow. Today the largest city in Malawi is called Blantyre, in honour of the birthplace of David Livingstone.

The Father
His Father, Neil Livingstone, was a dedicated Christian who had met his future wife, Agnes, when he was apprenticed to a local tailor. He won the hand of the tailor’s daughter and became a tea salesman so that he could travel and preach the Gospel, distributing Evangelistic tracts to his customers door-to-door. Neil also taught at Sunday school and was a zealous member of a local Missionary Society, persistently promoting prayer meetings and Missionary causes. David Livingstone later wrote concerning his Father: "He deserved my lasting gratitude and homage for presenting me from infancy with a continuously consistent pious example."

Strict Standards
Neil Livingstone was also a strict disciplinarian who sought to bring up David in the fear of the Lord. At age 9, David was challenged to learn the longest chapter in the Bible: Psalm 119 (all 176 verses) off by heart in order to receive a copy of the New Testament. Because Neil had seen the ravaging effects of alcoholism, he was a teetotaller and persuaded his son to follow his example in abstaining from alcohol, for life.

The Mother
David’s mother, Agnes, was a gentle, small and delicate woman whose compassionate kindness and loving nature served as a counter-balance to her husband’s strict and austere rule. It was said that her son, David, inherited her remarkably bright eyes. Agnes instilled in her family, a scrupulous concern for cleanliness and immaculate appearance. Later, Henry Morton Stanley commented on the immaculate standards of David Livingstone to his men as they began their epic 999 day expedition across the Congo: "Dr. Livingstone shaved every day of the 4 months, I was with him in the field and you will shave every day!"

The Napoleonic Wars
David was born during the last years of the ruinous Napoleonic wars which devastated Europe. The economic impact of the 25 years of French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars had left many unemployed in Britain and an economically depressed environment.

The Family
The Livingstone’s’ lived a very frugal lifestyle on a miniscule budget. The Livingstone family lived in a single room, ten feet by fourteen feet. Two baby boys had died in their infancy, David had one older surviving brother, John. Another brother, Charles, and two sisters, Janet and Agnes were born after David.

The Home
There was neither hot nor cold running water in the Tenement building and David had to walk many times a day down the tightly curved, brick staircase to fetch water from the pump in the yard, and heave it back up the stairs and along the corridor of the 3rd floor to their room. The Livingstone’s shared their Tenement with 24 other families. At night mattresses were pulled out from under the parents bed which was set into a recess in the wall. Privacy was non-existent and the family cooked, ate, sewed, studied and slept in that single room.

A Passion for Reading
David Livingstone borrowed extensively from the local library, particularly books on travel and science. William Wilberforce’s Practical Christianity had a major impact on his life and clearly influenced his life-long crusade against the slave trade. Sitting by the banks of the River Clyde, engrossed in a book, young David was startled to hear the desperate cries of a young girl and her baby brother drifting in a boat towards the weir of the old Mill. David immediately plunged into the icy waters and rescued them from disaster.

The Cotton Mill
At age 10, David began his full-time employment, 14 hours a day, 6 days a week, for the next 10 years at the Monteith and Company Cotton Spinning Factory. He was to be a piercer, to repair broken threads in spinning frames. David’s day began at 5:30am every morning as the bell was rung. Work would begin at 6am and continue until 8pm. The workers in the cotton mill had to work in tremendous heat and humidity. Steamed temperatures of 80 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit were considered ideal for the production of thread.

Physical Training
Every day David would have to walk an average of 34km, much of this in a crawling or stooping position, amongst and under the machinery, or balancing over it. One can imagine what tremendous physical training this was for his later transcontinental expeditions throughout Africa. Piercers received constant beatings from their supervisors to keep them moving through such long shifts, despite fatigue and exhaustion.

Hunger for Knowledge
Yet, David used his first week’s wages to purchase Ruddiman’s Rudiments of Latin. David managed to read in the factory by balancing his book on a portion of the spinning jenny so that he could catch sentence after sentence as he rushed by at his work. In this way he maintained fairly constant study undisturbed by the roar of the machinery. Less than 10% of the children who worked in the Cotton Mills ever learned to read or write. David not only learned to read and write, he taught himself Latin, Greek and Hebrew. After work, he would attend a night school, 8pm to 10pm. Then he returned home to study, often until midnight. His mother frequently had to take his books away before he would go to sleep.

Dr. Livingston Conversion
At age 12, David Livingstone came under intense conviction of sin and experienced a radical conversion to Christ. He wrote: "In the glow of love that Christianity inspired, I resolved to devote my life to the alleviation of human misery." He wrote: "That the Salvation of men ought to be the chief desire and aim of every Christian." He made a resolution that he would give to the cause of Missions all that he might earn beyond what was required for his subsistence.

Perseverance
At age 13, he attended an extra Latin class. When all the other students gave up, he alone remained in the class and the school teacher cancelled the lessons, not seeing the overzealous son of a tea merchant as worthy of his attention. David continued to learn Latin on his own.

The Grandfather
David’s grandfather, Neil Livingstone Senior, also had an impact on the upbringing of David. He had been a tenant farmer on the island of Ulva, off the West coast of Scotland. He was evicted by the English to open up the area for a vast sheep farm. He passed on what he had heard from his grandfather: "I have searched most carefully through all the traditions of our family, and I never could discover that there was a dishonest man among your forefathers. If therefore any of you, or any of your children, should take to dishonest ways, it will not be because it runs in our blood… I leave this precept with you; be honest!"

Thomas Burke
Another man who influenced David Livingstone was Thomas Burke, an old soldier who had fought in the Napoleonic Wars who would ring his bell to shatter the peace and quiet of Blantyre every Sunday morning to rouse the people to attend his early morning Prayer meeting. Burke was abrupt, direct and challenging. The Livingstone family faithfully supported him.

David Hogg
Another man who impressed David Livingstone was David Hogg, who from his deathbed challenged the young boy: "Now lad! Make religion the everyday business of your life and not a thing of fits and starts; for if you do not, temptation and other things will get the better of you!"

The Free Church
1832 was a special watershed year for the Livingstone family. Neil Livingstone, dissatisfied with the spiritual life of the Church of Scotland, changed his church membership to the Free Church. This required the Livingstones to walk to Hamilton, a nearby village for their Sunday worship services. Although they received many invitations to dine with families of the congregation, they chose to carry their own food and not impose upon the limited resources of the other families of the congregation, which they knew were also struggling financially. After Sunday lunch, the Livingstone family were treated to their one luxury, a barley sweet each. The Livingstones never accepted any hand-outs. They worked for everything they had.

Setting the Captives Free
The Free Church in Hamilton were strong supporters of Missions. In 1833, William Wilberforce’s lifelong crusade against slavery was successful. Slavery was abolished throughout the British Empire, by an act of Parliament. This inspired ever greater vision for Missions. Those who had been freed from physical slavery, now needed to be freed from spiritual slavery. Missionaries were needed to go to the ends of the earth!

Revival Fires
Books and tracts from the Revival movement sweeping America reached Scotland and created much excitement and deepening of spiritual life and vision. David Livingstone received a pamphlet written by Karl Gutzlaff, of the Netherlands Missionary Society. In it Gutzlaff appealed for medical missionaries to go to China. David was inspired at how a medical missionary could be much more effective in converting the lost. He had learned enough Latin to be able to understand most medical terms. He was remarkably well read and easily would pass the University entrance requirements. His chief obstacle would be lack of finances.

Dr. Peter Hammond
Frontline Fellowship
P.O. Box 74 Newlands 7725
Cape Town South Africa
Tel: 021-689-4480
Email:
mission@frontline.org.za
Website: www.frontline.org.za

See also:
The Challenge of Livingstone Today
Making Disciples of All Nations

Soli Deo Gloria

Go into all the World and Preach the Gospel . . .

7  And he said unto them, It is not for you to know the times or the seasons, which the Father hath put in his own power. 
8  But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth.
~ Acts 1:7,8

Our Lord Jesus Christ’s last command before ascending to the right hand of GOD our Father should be our most urgent business here upon the earth. We, the Body of Christ, the ekklesia (assembly, church) that our Saviour is building “and the gates of hell will not prevail against it” (Matthew 16:18), were given the “ministry of reconciliation” (2 Corinthians 5:18) so that we can be “ambassadors for Christ” (2 Corinthians 5:20) representing and preaching the Kingdom of GOD here upon the earth. As our Lord taught us to pray, “Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven” (Matthew 6:10) so we are to do our heavenly Father’s will here on earth as in heaven. Are you urgent about doing your heavenly Father’s will as you ought to be? Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ said,

50  For whosoever shall do the will of my Father which is in heaven, the same is my brother, and sister, and mother. ~ Matthew 12:50

Are you being obedient to GOD and walking as Christ Jesus walked, abiding in Him to bring forth much fruit? for,

6  He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk, even as he walked. ~ 1 John 2:6

8  Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit; so shall ye be my disciples. ~ John 15:8

Therefore saints, by way of encouragement and for GOD’s glory alone, seize the many opportunities that are presented to you as you “Go . . .”

At all times in obedience to our Great GOD, you need to step out of your comfort zones to reach the lost. The Preaching at Mahatma Gandhi Peace Walk 2015 in Pietermaritzburg on Sunday October 4, 2015 was such an opportunity to raise the Name of Jesus Christ to a predominantly Hindu gathering and other faiths / beliefs, for,

12  Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved. ~ Acts 4:12

Pietermaritzburg-20151004-00718A part of the crowd

Then there are those times when brethren meet to encourage one another as was the case with the meeting that took place with Brother Lungisa Joctrey on a sweltering hot day on Wednesday October 7, 2015 in the Pietermaritzburg CBD. Whilst he proclaimed the Gospel of GOD in isiZulu, a whole host of Gospel tracts were distributed in both isiZulu and English by Jono and Gary. We are always reminded by our Lord Jesus Who gave commandment,

15  And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature. ~ Mark 16:15

Brother ungisa preaching in isiZulu Preaching Christ Jesus

Or as was evident on this Lord’s day Sunday October 11, 2015. After meeting in my home and starting the General Epistle of James where we are instructed to “. . . be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves” (James 1:22) we went to Midmar Dam for lunch and continued our fellowship after picking up Cee-Jay’s mom Chantel. Our faith is to be a living and active faith. Our faith must be evident by our works,

18  Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works. ~ James 2:18

We are not saved by works – not by ‘works righteousness’ as the Roman Catholics, Muslims and other cults falsely teach – but our faith – true godly Christian faith – will show that it is genuine faith by the evidence of the works that follow the salvation of a truly born-again believer, as we read,

8  For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: 
9  Not of works, lest any man should boast. 
10  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them. ~ Ephesians 2:8-10

By way of application, whilst what seemed like just another day out with the family at the dam, . . .

At Midmar Dam: Morgenson Campsite opposite Blackhurst PeninsularCee-Jay in Midmar Dam L to R: Tammy, Cee-Jay and Chantel at the Cascades' riverCee-Jay rock hoppingCee-Jay in the midst of the riverClose-up of Cee-Jay

. . . if one is obedient to GOD’s Word and practice what you preach and teach, you can redeem the time and be fruitful by using every opportunity that presents itself. On the way home, a brief stop at the Howick Falls opened up the opportunity of preaching the Gospel of the Creator of Internet Archivethe Howick Falls, and many ‘fall-observers’ heard how to escape man’s sinful fall! A brief sermon can be heard by clicking the logo to the right. (Duration 13:18) > > >

The Scripture reading was from Psalm 24,

1  A Psalm of David. The earth is the LORD’S, and the fulness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein. ~ Psalm 24:1

The Howick FallsGary reading from Psalm 24:1People coming and some in attendance, like what appears to be a family of four (foreground)Proclaiming Christ Jesus from atop some stairs Ears hearing the Gospel of Jesus ChristA smaller group listening and passer-bysSome of the audience including what appears to be a family of four to the rightA trader on the side listened to the preaching and thanked usSoli Deo Gloria!Khoshenku (?) came asking for English literature

Brethren, walk after the Spirit of GOD and trust GOD to order your steps to do HIS will this side of eternity. Be obedient and faithful and do your work whilst you still have time.

20  Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant,
21  Make you perfect in every good work to do his will, working in you that which is wellpleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen. ~ Hebrews 13:20,21

Soli Deo Gloria!

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