Index to The Land Issue: South Africa 1652 – present

Flag of the Dutch East India Company svg This is the Index for the examination into South African History regarding the Land Issue and slavery. The information has been gleaned from various archived documents translated from the original autographs of the Journal of Commander Johan van Riebeeck of the Dutch East Indies Company (VOC) and others. To get a more full and comprehensive understanding of the historical context kindly consult the documents to read up on this subject more extensively.

In Part 1 we looked at the meticulous planning by the Dutch in the years 1649-1651 prior to Johan van Riebeeck and the designated parties sailing from Texel in the Netherlands on their voyage to the Cape of Good Hope to establish a refreshment station as undertaken by the VOC (Dutch East Indies Company).

VOC svgIn Part 2 we undertook the voyage from Texel in the Netherlands on 14th December 1651 sailing on the flag ship of the fleet, the Drommedaris, to the landing at the Cape of Good Hope on 6th April 1652. We also looked extensively at the lifestyle of the Dutch settlers and their work ethic, their relationships with the local Khoikhoi and San natives and other people groups from these clans. We looked also at the relationship between the Dutch and a native interpreter named Herry. This took our learning adventure into the early days of January 1653.

In Part 3 our investigations continued from the 9th of January 1653 looking back into life at the Cape of Good Hope, the relationships being forged between the local natives and the colonists, the Dutch Christian lifestyle, the assembly service and the gospel, daily trials and tribulations experienced by the Dutch, the birth of Johan and Maria van Riebeeck’s son, christened Abraham van Riebeeck, who was born on 18th October, 1653 at the Fort de Goede Hoop, Kaapkolonie (Cape Colony; present day Cape Town), making Abraham a born white African and therefore ‘a son of Africa.’ We read about a Christian marriage on African soil, native theft and the murder of a Dutch cattle herdsman and the subsequent forgiveness to continue with friendly communications and dealings between black and white peoples. This part would end in December 1653.

KJV In Part 4 we looked at the Christian attitudes to ‘slaves’ and we examined the Biblical teachings concerning ‘slaves’ and ‘slavery’ which is very different to the evil and wicked practices of sinful white and black men who were involved in the slave trade. We looked at the Biblical recordings of the true intension of what ‘slaves’ were to be which are servants in wilful servitude and the protections afforded those servants. We also examined the word ‘kafir’ delving into the etymology thereof and discovering the origins to be Arabian and the Islamic use of the word means ‘disbeliever.’ We then went even further back into history and ascertained that slavery stems from the Arabic world where Islam was birthed, and we see that Islamic slavery is still active and alive to this very day.

In Part 5 we continued from Part 4 looking at the Christian ethos of living neighbourly and exercising forgiveness when wronged as well as looking into certain referenced articles that gave a more full reflection of life at the Cape of Good Hope, of the local natives and the slaves brought to the Cape from the East.

Slave Lodge museum in modern day Cape TownAnd in the final Part 6 we looked at the Slave Lodge and its inhabitants where the information gleaned in this respect comes from the Iziko Museums of South Africa website, being an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture, a post-1994 governmental organ of the New South Africa. We looked at the Heritage of Slavery, the Christian religion and schooling and we also looked at a Biblical answer to land ownership before concluding that the South African land issue is not just about ‘white owned land being expropriated without compensation’, but that the Mfecane could well also be a factor that needs addressing in the greater context of ‘land ownership redistribution!’

We look forward to receiving the readers’ comments in respect of these various parts and also your feed back. Until later,

Soli Deo Gloria

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: